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A comparison of genetic connectivity in two deep sea corals to examine whether seamounts are isolated islands or stepping stones for dispersal

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dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor University Of Western Australia
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (csiro)
dc.contributor Indian Ocean Marine Res Ctr
dc.contributor Univ Western Australia
dc.contributor Csiro Oceans & Atmosphere Flagship
dc.contributor.author MILLER, KAREN J.
dc.contributor.author GUNASEKERA, RASANTHI M.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-08T01:08:58Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-08T01:08:58Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:05:47Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-08T01:08:58Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-08T01:08:58Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:05:47Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-10
dc.identifier.citation Miller KJ, Gunasekera RM (2017) A comparison of genetic connectivity in two deep sea corals to examine whether seamounts are isolated islands or stepping stones for dispersal. Scientific Reports 7: 46103
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/10103
dc.description.abstract Ecological processes in the deep sea are poorly understood due to the logistical constraints of sampling thousands of metres below the ocean's surface and remote from most land masses. Under such circumstances, genetic data provides unparalleled insight into biological and ecological relationships. We use microsatellite DNA to compare the population structure, reproductive mode and dispersal capacity in two deep sea corals from seamounts in the Southern Ocean. The solitary coral Desmophyllum dianthus has widespread dispersal consistent with its global distribution and resilience to disturbance. In contrast, for the matrix-forming colonial coral Solenosmilia variabilis asexual reproduction is important and the dispersal of sexually produced larvae is negligible, resulting in isolated populations. Interestingly, despite the recognised impacts of fishing on seamount communities, genetic diversity on fished and unfished seamounts was similar for both species, suggesting that evolutionary resilience remains despite reductions in biomass. Our results provide empirical evidence that a group of seamounts can function either as isolated islands or stepping stones for dispersal for different taxa. Furthermore different strategies will be required to protect the two sympatric corals and consequently the recently declared marine reserves in this region may function as a network for D. dianthus, but not for S. variabilis.
dc.description.sponsorship This study was funded through the Australian Government Commonwealth Environmental Research Fund (CERF) Marine Biodiversity Hub and the Australian Pacific Science Foundation. The authors thank Alan Williams, Ashley Rowden, Di Tracey and Mireille Consalvey for facilitating field collections of corals and Phillip England for facilitating microsatellite development and laboratory work. Alyce Hancock assisted with DNA extractions for S. variabilis with genotyping completed by the Australian Genome Research Foundation.
dc.language English
dc.subject Atlantic
dc.subject Management
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject Southern-ocean
dc.subject Lophelia-pertusa
dc.subject Effective Population-size
dc.subject Diversity
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Flow
dc.subject Seascape Genetics
dc.subject Phylogeography
dc.subject Larval Dispersal
dc.title A comparison of genetic connectivity in two deep sea corals to examine whether seamounts are isolated islands or stepping stones for dispersal
dc.type journal article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/srep46103
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000398970400001


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