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Copepod egg production and food resources in Exmouth gulf, western Australia

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dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author AYUKAI, T
dc.contributor.author MCKINNON, AD
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:27:53Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:54:08Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:27:53Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-21T21:50:46Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:54:08Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:54:08Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:27:53Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-21T21:50:46Z
dc.date.issued 1996-01-01
dc.identifier 1029 en
dc.identifier.citation McKinnon AD and Ayukai T (1996) Copepod egg production and food resources in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia. Marine and Freshwater Research. 47:595-603. en
dc.identifier.issn 1323-1650
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/1029
dc.description.abstract Measurements of plankton community structure, copepod egg production and potential copepod trophic resources were made in Exmouth Gulf, north-western Australia. Egg production rates by four of the dominant copepod species-Acartia fossae, Parvocalanus crassirostris, Oithona attenuata and O. simplex-were measured by bottle incubations and the egg-ratio technique. Plankton abundance and biomass did not differ greatly within the gulf; however, highest values of chlorophyll a, particulate carbon and nitrogen, and copepod egg production rates occurred in the south-east of the gulf. Though egg production rates were low and apparently severely food-limited, resuspension of bottom sediments or export of material from adjacent salt flats may fuel production in shallow inshore areas of the gulf. P. crassirostris appeared to be omnivorous and O. attenuata primarily herbivorous, but the trophic resources used by O. simplex and A. fossae could not be identified. From the egg production data, it was calculated that adult females of the four dominant copepod species graze 12% of the total particulate carbon each day.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.ispartof Marine and Freshwater Research - pages: 47:595-603 en
dc.relation.uri http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/5bfaaf90-753e-11dc-885e-00008a07204e en
dc.subject Variability
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Fisheries
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Oithona
dc.subject Long
dc.subject Respiration
dc.subject Planktonic Copepod
dc.subject Lagoon
dc.subject Marine Copepod
dc.subject Rates
dc.subject Limnology
dc.subject Acartia-tonsa
dc.title Copepod egg production and food resources in Exmouth gulf, western Australia
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:A1996VK13500003


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