Publication Repository

Application of baited remote underwater video surveys to quantify spatial distribution of elasmobranchs at an ecosystem scale

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Sch Earth & Environm Sci
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor.author HEUPEL, M. R.
dc.contributor.author WHITE, J.
dc.contributor.author SIMPFENDORFER, C. A.
dc.contributor.author TOBIN, A. J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:08:53Z
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-18T05:16:39Z
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-18T05:16:39Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:10:01Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:08:53Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-18T05:16:39Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-18T05:16:39Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:10:01Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10-01
dc.identifier.citation White JR, Simpfendorfer CA, Tobin AJ, Heupel MR (2013) Application of baited remote underwater video surveys to quantify spatial distribution of elasmobranchs at an ecosystem scale. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 448: 281-288 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0022-0981
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/10420
dc.description.abstract Understanding the distribution of mobile species across broad spatial scales and a variety of habitat types is essential in developing sound conservation strategies. The applicability of baited remote under-water video station (BRUVS) to determine the distribution of elasmobranchs at broad spatial scales (12 degrees latitude) and across a range of habitat types was assessed. Shark-like batoids within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) were chosen as a case study, given the conservation concern surrounding these species, limited knowledge of their spatial ecology and their exposure to fishing. Rhynchobatus spp. (88.9%), were most frequently observed followed by Rhina ancylostoma (7.1%) and Glaucostegus typos (3.9%). Shark-like batoids were observed across a wide depth range (10.4-87.5 m), showing highest affinity for 30-40 m. The main predictors of Rhynchobatus spp. presence in the GBRMP were location, substrate type and season with individuals more commonly observed during winter and autumn in regions with substrates dominated by mud or gravel. There was no difference in the proportion of BRUVS in which shark-like batoids were observed between fished and unfished marine park zones. Surveys with BRUVS offer a standardized, non-extractive technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of mobile species that are difficult to sample using conventional techniques across broad spatial scales. Information generated using BRUVS may be useful in helping design improved conservation strategies for rare or threatened elasmobranchs. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorship This study is an output of the ¿Great Barrier Reef Seabed Biodiversity Project¿, a collaboration between the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Queensland Primary Industries & Fisheries (Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), formerly QDPIF) and the Queensland Museum (QM). The project was funded by the CRC Reef Research Centre, the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) and the National Oceans Office, and led by Drs R. Pitcher (Principal Investigator, CSIRO), P. Doherty (AIMS), J. Hooper (QM) and N. Gribble (QDPIF). Jimmy White was funded by a Smart State PhD scholarship and a James Cook University Postgraduate Scholarship en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This study is an output of the 'Great Barrier Reef Seabed Biodiversity Project', a collaboration between the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Queensland Primary Industries & Fisheries (Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI), formerly QDPIF) and the Queensland Museum (QM). The project was funded by the CRC Reef Research Centre, the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) and the National Oceans Office, and led by Drs R Pitcher (Principal Investigator, CSIRO), P. Doherty (AIMS), J. Hooper (QM) and N. Gribble (QDPIF). The authors would like to thank Mike Cappo (AIMS) for making the data available, valuable comments during manuscript development and the contribution of Fig. I. Jimmy White was funded by a Smart State PhD scholarship and a James Cook University Postgraduate Scholarship. [ST]
dc.description.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098113002955# en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Shark-like Batoids
dc.subject Conservation
dc.subject Mesh Selectivity
dc.subject Australia
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Spatial Distribution
dc.subject Catch Rates
dc.subject Marine Protected Areas
dc.subject Subtropical Embayment
dc.subject Fish Assemblages
dc.subject Pelagic Sharks
dc.subject Shark Populations
dc.subject Western North-atlantic
dc.subject Bruvs
dc.title Application of baited remote underwater video surveys to quantify spatial distribution of elasmobranchs at an ecosystem scale
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.jembe.2013.08.004
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000326430500035


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Publication


Browse

My Account