Publication Repository

Crown-of-thorns starfish predation and physical injuries promote brown band disease on corals

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Sch Marine & Trop Biol
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Aims Jcu
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Arc Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies
dc.contributor.author WILLIS, BETTE L.
dc.contributor.author KATZ, SEFANO M.
dc.contributor.author POLLOCK, F. JOSEPH
dc.contributor.author BOURNE, DAVID G.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-20T04:32:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-20T04:32:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:08:46Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:23:58Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:08:46Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-20T04:32:30Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-20T04:32:30Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:23:58Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-01
dc.identifier.citation Katz SM, Pollock FJ, Bourne DG, Willis BL (2014) Crown-of-thorns starfish predation and physical injuries promote brown band disease on corals. Coral Reefs 33(3): 705-716 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0722-4028
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/10443
dc.description.abstract Brown band (BrB) disease manifests on corals as a ciliate-dominated lesion that typically progresses rapidly causing extensive mortality, but it is unclear whether the dominant ciliate Porpostoma guamense is a primary or an opportunistic pathogen, the latter taking advantage of compromised coral tissue or depressed host resistance. In this study, manipulative aquarium-based experiments were used to investigate the role of P. guamense as a pathogen when inoculated onto fragments of the coral Acropora hyacinthus that were either healthy, preyed on by Acanthaster planci (crown-of-thorns starfish; COTS), or experimentally injured. Following ciliate inoculation, BrB lesions developed on all of COTS-predated fragments (n = 9 fragments) and progressed up to 4.6 +/- A 0.3 cm d(-1), resulting in similar to 70 % of coral tissue loss after 4 d. Similarly, BrB lesions developed rapidly on experimentally injured corals and similar to 38 % of coral tissue area was lost 60 h after inoculation. In contrast, no BrB lesions were observed on healthy corals following experimental inoculations. A choice experiment demonstrated that ciliates are strongly attracted to physically injured corals, with over 55 % of inoculated ciliates migrating to injured corals and forming distinct lesions, whereas ciliates did not migrate to healthy corals. Our results indicate that ciliates characteristic of BrB disease are opportunistic pathogens that rapidly migrate to and colonise compromised coral tissue, leading to rapid coral mortality, particularly following predation or injury. Predicted increases in tropical storms, cyclones, and COTS outbreaks are likely to increase the incidence of coral injury in the near future, promoting BrB disease and further contributing to declines in coral cover.
dc.description.sponsorship The authors acknowledge Naohisa Wada, Manuela Giammusso and the staff of Orpheus Island Research Station for their technical assistance in the pilot study, and to Liam Zarri and the staff of Lizard Island Research Station for their technical and logistical support. The authors also acknowledge Jean-Baptiste Raina for his assistance with statistical analyses, and Emmanuelle Botte, Jason Doyle, Kathleen Morrow and Andrew Muirhead for their laboratory assistance and advice at the Australian Institute of Marine Science. The authors also thank two anonymous reviewers for their comments that improved the article. This work was funded by a Lizard Island Research Foundation Fellowship awarded to F. J. Pollock for study at Lizard Island Research Station, a facility of the Australian Museum, and by funding to B. L. Willis through the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.
dc.description.sponsorship This work was funded by a Lizard Island Research Foundation Fellowship awarded to F.J. Pollock for study at Lizard Island Research Station, a facility of the Australian Museum, and by funding to B.L. Willis through the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. en_US
dc.description.uri http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00338-014-1153-2 en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher SpringerLink en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Tropical Cyclones
dc.subject Crown-of-thorns Starfish
dc.subject Regeneration
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Opportunistic Pathogen
dc.subject Porpostoma Guamense
dc.subject Coral Disease
dc.subject Red-sea
dc.subject Acanthaster-planci
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Protozoa
dc.subject Ciliate
dc.subject Brown Band Disease
dc.subject Scleractinian Corals
dc.subject Reproduction
dc.subject Injury
dc.title Crown-of-thorns starfish predation and physical injuries promote brown band disease on corals
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s00338-014-1153-2
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000340395300016


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Publication


Browse

My Account