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Habitat and space use of an abundant nearshore shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Sch Earth & Environm Sci
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Aims Jcu
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor.author HEUPEL, M. R.
dc.contributor.author MUNROE, S. E. M.
dc.contributor.author SIMPFENDORFER, C. A.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-10T04:52:18Z
dc.date.accessioned 2014-11-10T04:52:18Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:09:05Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:26:46Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:09:05Z
dc.date.available 2014-11-10T04:52:18Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:09:05Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:26:46Z
dc.date.issued 2014-01-01
dc.identifier.citation Munroe SEM, Simpfendorfer CA, Heupel MR (2014) Habitat and space use of an abundant nearshore shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori. Marine and Freshwater Research 65(11): 959-968 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1323-1650
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/10626
dc.description.abstract Shark resource-use strategies affect how they will respond to changes within their environment and, as such, may be important to consider in conservation and management. Movement data on sharks that use nearshore areas is particularly valuable because these habitats are highly dynamic. The present study used passive acoustic telemetry to examine the space-use, habitat-selection and habitat-specialisation patterns of the Australian sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori, in a nearshore area. Habitat selectivity and specialisation were assessed across five benthic habitat types, including outer bay, seagrass, reef, sandy inshore and intertidal mudflats. The majority of R. taylori sharks were present for short periods of time, ranging from 1 to 112 days (mean +/- s.e. = 16.9 +/- 4.9). Activity-space analysis indicated that R. taylori roamed widely, but monthly activity-space size was consistent among individuals and through time. Both the population and individuals displayed wide habitat niches, indicating that the species may be resilient to environmental change. However, R. taylori consistently selected for seagrass over other habitats, potentially for feeding. Therefore, declines in seagrass availability may reduce R. taylori presence in nearshore areas and may be relevant to spatial management of this species.
dc.description.sponsorship We thank all the staff and students at the Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture including, Fernanda de Faria, Vinay Udaywer, Mario Espinoza, Madeline Green, Lauren Meyer, Jonathan Smart, and countless volunteers for their help and support of this project. Primary financial support for acoustic tracking came from National Environmental Research Project which was awarded to M. R. H. and C. A. S. S. E. M. M. was also supported by an International Student Postgraduate Research Scholarship funded by the Australian Institute for Marine Science (AIMS) AIMS@JCU program. Additional support was provided by James Cook University's School of Earth and Environmental Science (SEES). All research was conducted in accordance with JCU animal ethics permit A1566 and Great Barrier Reef (G11/346181.1) and DEEDI (144482) permits for animal collection.
dc.description.sponsorship Primary financial support for acoustic tracking came from National Environmental Research Project which was awarded to M. R. H. and C. A. S. S. E. M. M. was also supported by an International Student Postgraduate Research Scholarship funded by the Australian Institute for Marine Science (AIMS) AIMS@JCU program. Additional support was provided by James Cook University's School of Earth and Environmental Science (SEES). en_US
dc.description.uri http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/MF13272.htm en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher CSIRO Publishing en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Residency
dc.subject Juvenile Lemon Sharks
dc.subject Kernel-utilisation Distributions
dc.subject Fisheries
dc.subject Florida Estuary
dc.subject Climate-change
dc.subject Sphyrna-tiburo
dc.subject Australian Sharpnose Shark
dc.subject Limnology
dc.subject Negaprion-brevirostris
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Marine Protected Areas
dc.subject Movement Patterns
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Ecological Specialization
dc.subject Small-bodied Sharks
dc.subject Seagrass Ecosystem
dc.title Habitat and space use of an abundant nearshore shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1071/MF13272
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000344381700002


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