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Is acoustic tracking appropriate for air-breathing marine animals? Dugongs as a case study

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Sch Biol Sci
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor Marine & Atmospher Res
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Moreton Bay Res Stn
dc.contributor University Of Queensland
dc.contributor Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (csiro)
dc.contributor Coll Marine & Environm Sci
dc.contributor Univ Queensland
dc.contributor Aims Jcu
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Csiro
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor.author MARSH, HELENE
dc.contributor.author ZEH, DANIEL R.
dc.contributor.author HEUPEL, MICHELLE R.
dc.contributor.author LIMPUS, COLIN J.
dc.contributor.author HAMANN, MARK
dc.contributor.author FUENTES, MARIANA M. P. B.
dc.contributor.author BABCOCK, RUSSEL C.
dc.contributor.author PILLANS, RICHARD D.
dc.contributor.author TOWNSEND, KATHY A.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-12T05:36:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-12T05:36:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:55:53Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:03:25Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:55:53Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:55:53Z
dc.date.available 2015-02-12T05:36:30Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:03:25Z
dc.date.issued 2015-03-01
dc.identifier.citation Zeh DR, Heupel MR, Limpus CJ, Hamann M, Fuentes MMPB, Babcock RC, Pillans RD, Townsend KA, Marsh H (2015) Is acoustic tracking appropriate for air-breathing marine animals? Dugongs as a case study. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 464: 1-10 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0022-0981
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/10782
dc.description.abstract Marine animals face increased pressure through expanded shipping and recreational activities. Effective conservation and management of large species like marine mammals or sea turtles depend on knowledge of movement and habitat use. Previous studies have used data collected from either satellite or acoustic telemetry but rarely both. In this study, data from satellite and acoustic technologies were used to: determine the efficacy of satellite and acoustic telemetry to define dugong movement patterns; compare the benefits and limitations of each approach; examine the costs of each approach in relation to the amount and type of data provided; and relate telemetry data to the boundaries of a Go Slow area designed to protect dugongs and turtles from vessel strike within an urbanised coastal embayment (Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia). Twenty-one dugongs were captured in seagrass habitats on the Eastern Banks of Moreton Bay in July-September 2012 and July 2013 and fitted with GPS and acoustic transmitters. Both satellite and acoustic telemetry produced reliable presence and movement data for individual dugongs. When the dugongs were within the range of the acoustic array, there was relatively good correspondence between the overall space use measures derived from GPS and acoustic transmitters, demonstrating that acoustic tracking is a potentially valuable and cost-effective tool for monitoring local dugong habitat use in environments equipped with acoustic receiver arrays. Acoustic technology may be particularly useful for species that establish home ranges with stable residency especially near large urban or port environs. However, the relative merits of the two technologies depend on the research question in the context of the species of interest, the location of the study and whether the study site has an established acoustic array. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by an Australian Marine Mammal Centre grant to H. Marsh and M. Heupel. D. Zeh was supported by funding from AIMS@JCU and the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences. Some of the acoustic receivers utilised in this research were part of the Australian Animal Tagging and Monitoring System (AATAMS) facility of the Integrated Marine Observing System competitive receiver pool. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by an Australian Marine Mammal Centre grant to H. Marsh and M. Heupel. D. Zeh was supported by funding from AIMS@JCU and the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, JCU. This research was conducted under the following permits: Marine Parks QS2013/MAN213, QDEHP WISP69649711 and James Cook University Animal Ethics Permit A1683. Some of the acoustic receivers utilised in this research were part of the Australian Animal Tagging and Monitoring System (AATAMS) facility of the Integrated Marine Observing System competitive receiver pool. The authors thank the AATAMS staff for their support. The CSIRO Division of Marine Research provided all acoustic receivers in 2012 and six in 2013. The authors also thank the following people who helped with field efforts including: C Cleguer, F. de Faria, N. FitzSimmons, C. Gredzens, C. Heatherington, J. Meager, S. Preston, J. Smith and K. Townsend. M. Flint provided veterinary oversight for the dugong catching in 2013 and J. Powell assisted with the design of the 2013 tether attachment. The authors thank the staff and volunteers of the Moreton Bay Marine Research Station for the assistance with the deployment maintenance and downloading of acoustic receivers and C. Roelfsema for detailed seagrass data. [SS]
dc.description.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022098114003153 en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Marine Wildlife
dc.subject Moreton Bay
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Satellite
dc.subject Protected Areas
dc.subject Signature Whistles
dc.subject Home-range Analysis
dc.subject Tursiops-truncatus
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Underwater Audiogram
dc.subject Telemetry
dc.subject Satellite Telemetry
dc.subject Ocean Observing System
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Acoustic
dc.subject Trichechus-manatus-latirostris
dc.subject Florida Manatees
dc.subject Gps
dc.subject Dugong Dugon
dc.subject Bottle-nosed Dolphins
dc.title Is acoustic tracking appropriate for air-breathing marine animals? Dugongs as a case study
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.jembe.2014.11.013
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000349730500001


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