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Conservation challenges of sharks with continental scale migrations

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dc.contributor.author Heupel, Michelle (MR)
dc.contributor.author Simpfendorfer, Colin (CA)
dc.contributor.author Espinoza, Mario (M)
dc.contributor.author Smoothey, Amy (AF)
dc.contributor.author Tobin, Andrew (AJ)
dc.contributor.author Peddemors, Victor (V)
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-04T00:43:28Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:01:20Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-08T02:10:51Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-04T00:43:28Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:01:20Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-08T02:10:51Z
dc.date.issued 2015-02
dc.identifier.citation Heupel MR, Simpfendorfer CA, Espinoza M, Smoothey AF, Tobin A, Peddemors V (2015) Conservation challenges of sharks with continental scale migrations. Frontiers in Marine Science 2:12. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2015.00012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/11000
dc.description.abstract Understanding movement and connectivity of populations is increasingly important as human and climate change pressures become more pervasive, but can be problematic in difficult to observe species such as large marine predators. We examined the movements of bull sharks, Carcharhinus leucas, using acoustic telemetry arrays along the east coast of Australia. Approximately half of 75 individuals released in temperate waters moved into tropical reef regions, with both sexes undertaking long-range movements and multiple individuals making return trips. Only 3% of 39 individuals released in tropical reef habitats moved south to temperate waters, but approximately 25% moved to southern reef or subtropical coastal areas. These results reveal complex linkages along the east coast of Australia which suggest a tropical reef based population comprised of individuals that migrate to multiple regions. Connectivity between locations along the east coast of Australia creates important conservation challenges for resource managers in multiple jurisdictions. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship We thank the Australian Animal Tagging and Monitoring System for their contribution of infrastructure and field support. en_US
dc.description.uri http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2015.00012/abstract en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Open-Access en_US
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 Australia *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/ *
dc.title Conservation challenges of sharks with continental scale migrations en_US
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fmars.2015.00012


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