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Diversity in immature-shark communities along a tropical coastline

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Coll Marine & Environm Sci
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor.author SIMPFENDORFER, COLIN A.
dc.contributor.author YATES, PETER M.
dc.contributor.author HEUPEL, MICHELLE R.
dc.contributor.author TOBIN, ANDREW J.
dc.contributor.author MOORE, STEPHEN K.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-11T02:21:22Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:55:52Z
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-11T02:21:22Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:02:32Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-11T02:21:22Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-11T02:21:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:55:52Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:02:32Z
dc.date.issued 2015-01-01
dc.identifier.citation Yates PM, Heupel MR, Tobin AJ, Moore SK, Simpfendorfer CA (2015) Diversity in immature-shark communities along a tropical coastline. Marine and Freshwater Research 66(5): 399-410 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1323-1650
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/11181
dc.description.abstract Effective conservation and management of shark populations is complicated by our limited understanding of their spatial ecology. For example, there are scarce data on diversity in community structure and nursery function across broader geographic scales (e.g. across multiple inshore systems) and the implications of this diversity for shark populations. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark communities along 400km of the tropical eastern coast of Australia (18.1-20.6 degrees S, 146.0-148.8 degrees E). A variety of shark species were encountered, with 19 species of Carcharhiniformes contributing 99.2% of the total shark catch. Of the 1806 sharks captured, 567 were immature, including 336 young-of-the-year individuals. Immature sharks from 18 species were present; however, interspecific variation in the proportions of life-history stages was apparent. Multivariate analyses identified significant spatial heterogeneity in immature-shark communities. Results also highlighted the importance of tropical coastal habitats for numerous shark species, and indicated community-wide spatial structuring of sharks on the basis of body size rather than life-history stage. In addition to building on traditional shark-nursery paradigms, these results demonstrated that data on nursery function from restricted areas may not accurately portray patterns occurring over broader geographic scales, and this diversity may provide population-level benefits for sharks.
dc.description.sponsorship The authors are especially grateful to the volunteers who assisted with field work. M. Sheaves provided valuable statistical advice. The suggestions of two anonymous reviewers were helpful in improving this manuscript. Funding for this research was provided by the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program under the Tropical Ecosystems Hub. P. Yates was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award. Sampling was conducted under a Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry General Fisheries Permit #144482 and Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Permit #G11/34618.1. All procedures were approved by James Cook University's Animal Ethics Committee #A1566. The maps in Fig. 1 incorporate data that are copyright Commonwealth of Australia (Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority) [2012].
dc.description.sponsorship Funding for this research was provided by the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program under the Tropical Ecosystems Hub. P. Yates was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award. en_US
dc.description.uri http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/MF14033.htm en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_AU en_US
dc.publisher CSIRO Publishing en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Life-history Traits
dc.subject Fisheries
dc.subject Juvenile Sandbar Sharks
dc.subject Community Structure
dc.subject Lemon Sharks
dc.subject Nursery Areas
dc.subject Portfolio Effect
dc.subject Northern Australia
dc.subject Australian Sharpnose Shark
dc.subject Limnology
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Negaprion-brevirostris
dc.subject Sphyrna-lewini
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Elasmobranch
dc.subject Coastal Shark
dc.title Diversity in immature-shark communities along a tropical coastline
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1071/MF14033
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000353898600002


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