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Recovering microplastics from marine samples: A review of current practices

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dc.contributor Coll Sci & Engn
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Aims Jcu
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor Div Res & Innovat
dc.contributor.author MOTTI, CHERIE A.
dc.contributor.author MILLER, MICHAELA E.
dc.contributor.author KROON, FREDERIEKE J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-10T18:03:27Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-10T18:03:27Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-21T21:49:25Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-10T18:03:27Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-10T18:03:27Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-21T21:49:25Z
dc.date.issued 2017-10-15
dc.identifier.citation Miller ME, Kroon FJ, Motti CA (2017) Recovering microplastics from marine samples: A review of current practices. Marine Pollution Bulletin 123: 6-18
dc.identifier.issn 0025-326X
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/12021
dc.description.abstract An important component of microplastic research is development of reproducible methods for microplastic recovery and characterization. Presented is a review of the literature comparing microplastic separation and identification methodologies from seawater, sediment and marine organisms. The efficiency of methods was examined, including processing time, recovery rates, and potential destruction of microplastics. Visual examination and acid digestion were the most common separation methods for seawater samples and organisms, while density flotation was the primary method for sediment. Few studies reported recovery rates, or investigated the physical or chemical impact on plastics. This knowledge gap may lead to misidentification of plastic or unreliable pollution estimates. Further investigation of the impact chemical treatments have on plastic is warranted. Factors, i.e. biomass loading, recovery rates, and chemical compatibility, must be considered to allow for appropriate methodology. Standardizing this will contribute to efficient sample processing, and allow for direct comparison of microplastic contamination across environments.
dc.description.sponsorship Thanks to AIMS@JCU for the Pilot Research Award to M.M. Special thanks to Dr. Kathryn Berry for her critique of the draft manuscript.
dc.language English
dc.subject Enzymatic Digestion
dc.subject Visual Separation
dc.subject Gastrointestinal-tract
dc.subject Atlantic-ocean
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Mediterranean Sea
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject Demersal Fish
dc.subject Plastic Debris
dc.subject Gulf-of-mexico
dc.subject Ingestion
dc.subject Density Flotation
dc.subject Extraction
dc.subject North-sea
dc.subject Acid Digestion
dc.subject Human Consumption
dc.subject Particles
dc.subject Sediments
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Ftir
dc.subject Environmental-samples
dc.subject Marine Plastic Pollution
dc.subject Portuguese Coast
dc.subject Coastal Waters
dc.title Recovering microplastics from marine samples: A review of current practices
dc.type journal article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.08.058
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000415776600014


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