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A large predatory reef fish species moderates feeding and activity patterns in response to seasonal and latitudinal temperature variation

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dc.contributor Sch Earth & Environm Sci
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Arc Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor.author PRATCHETT, MORGAN
dc.contributor.author TOBIN, ANDREW
dc.contributor.author HEUPEL, MICHELLE
dc.contributor.author SCOTT, MOLLY
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-10T18:20:21Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-10T18:20:21Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:25:17Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-10T18:20:21Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-10T18:20:21Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:25:17Z
dc.date.issued 2017-10-11
dc.identifier.citation Scott M, Heupel M, Tobin A, Pratchett M (2017) A large predatory reef fish species moderates feeding and activity patterns in response to seasonal and latitudinal temperature variation. Scientific Reports 7: 12966
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/12042
dc.description.abstract Climate-driven increases in ocean temperatures are expected to affect the metabolic requirements of marine species substantially. To mitigate the impacts of increasing temperatures in the short-term, it may be necessary for ectothermic organisms to alter their foraging behaviour and activity. Herein, we investigate seasonal variation in foraging behaviour and activity of latitudinally distinct populations of a large coral reef predator, the common coral trout, Plectropomus leopardus, from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. P. leopardus exhibited increased foraging frequency in summer versus winter time, irrespective of latitude, however, foraging frequency substantially declined at water temperatures >30 degrees C. Foraging frequency also decreased with body size but there was no interaction with temperature. Activity patterns were directly correlated with water temperature; during summer, the low-latitude population of P. leopardus spent up to 62% of their time inactive, compared with 43% for the high-latitude population. The impact of water temperature on activity patterns was greatest for larger individuals. These results show that P. leopardus moderate their foraging behaviour and activity according to changes in ambient temperatures. It seems likely that increasing ocean temperatures may impose significant constraints on the capacity of large-bodied fishes to obtain sufficient prey resources while simultaneously conserving energy.
dc.description.sponsorship The authors would like to sincerely thank A. Graba-Landry, A. Buck, M. Mendes, M. McWilliam, E. Hoonhout, and E. Sacre for volunteering their time for the field work component of this project, A. Vail for advice on behavioural observations of coral trout, M. Logan, R. Jones and S. Matthews for statistical advice, M. McWilliam for helpful discussions of the manuscript, and staff at Lizard Island and Heron Island Research Stations. Funding was provided by Australian Museum Research Institute (AMRI) Post Graduate Award, AIMS@JCU Pilot Study Award, SeaWorld Research and Rescue Foundation Inc. and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.
dc.language English
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Thermal Tolerance
dc.subject Trophic Interactions
dc.subject Climate-change
dc.subject Space Use
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject Oxygen Limitation
dc.subject Warming Waters
dc.subject Plectropomus-leopardus Pisces
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Body-size
dc.title A large predatory reef fish species moderates feeding and activity patterns in response to seasonal and latitudinal temperature variation
dc.type journal article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-017-13277-4
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000412781300034


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