Publication Repository

Seeing is believing: metabolism provides insight into threat perception for a prey species of coral reef fish

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Univ Tasmania
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (csiro)
dc.contributor Coll Marine & Environm Sci
dc.contributor Csiro Agr Flagship
dc.contributor University Of Tasmania
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor.author CLARK, TIMOTHY D.
dc.contributor.author HALL, APRIL E.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-03T06:20:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:03:56Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:03:56Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:13:08Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:03:56Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-03T06:20:30Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-03T06:20:30Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:13:08Z
dc.date.issued 2016-05-01
dc.identifier.citation Hall AE, Clark TD (2016) Seeing is believing: metabolism provides insight into threat perception for a prey species of coral reef fish. Animal Behaviour 115: 117-126 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0003-3472
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/12600
dc.description.abstract Responding appropriately to predator threat is a critical survival skill for all organisms. Under-responding can result in death, while continually over-responding can waste precious energy reserves and compromise important life history attributes such as growth and reproduction. This trade-off becomes particularly pertinent in predator-rich environments such as coral reefs, yet almost nothing is known of the sublethal physiological responses that coral reef predators elicit in their prey. To address this knowledge gap, we designed equipment and protocols to measure the metabolic responses of a common coral reef fish (juvenile ambon damsel, Pomacentrus amboinensis) to chemosensory and visual stimuli of a common predator (adult yellow dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus). Pomacentrus amboinensis did not exhibit a metabolic response to the chemosensory predator stimulus, yet there was a consistent and significant metabolic response to the visual stimulus that endured for at least 24 h if the predator remained visible. A complete lack of metabolic response of P. amboinensis to the visual stimulus of a nonpredatory wrasse, Halichoeres argus, revealed an impressive ability of juvenile P. amboinensis to rapidly discriminate between similar-sized predatory and nonpredatory fishes. These divergent metabolic responses of P. amboinensis were not explained by measureable differences in their swimming behaviour in the predator versus nonpredator treatments, yet prey that were exposed to repeat predation attempts (predatory strikes) had the strongest metabolic response to the predator. Our findings demonstrate the capacity of coral reef fishes to interpret predator cues and prioritize threats and actions. Moreover, this study is the first to demonstrate that high predator densities on coral reefs could result in repetitive short-term or even chronic long-term elevations in energy expenditure of prey communities. (C) 2016 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorship Financial support was provided by the Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (JCU) and by the Australian Institute of Marine Science. en
dc.description.sponsorship We thank David Hall for help with field and laboratory work, as well as the staff of the Lizard Island Research Station for logistical support. Thanks to Rhondda Jones for assistance with statistical analysis. Financial support was provided by the Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (JCU) and by the Australian Institute of Marine Science. The authors declare no competing interests.
dc.description.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000334721600083X en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Behavior
dc.subject Marine Fish
dc.subject Chemical Alarm Cues
dc.subject Behavioral Sciences
dc.subject Recognition
dc.subject Zoology
dc.subject Risk
dc.subject Responses
dc.subject Sensitive Predator Avoidance
dc.subject Damselfish
dc.subject Mortality
dc.subject Ventilatory Frequency
dc.subject Oxygen Consumption Rate en_US
dc.subject Metabolism en_US
dc.subject Olfactory And Visual Predator Stimuli en_US
dc.subject Metabolic Stress Response en_US
dc.subject Pomacentrus Amboinensis en_US
dc.subject Predation en_US
dc.subject Predator Recognition en_US
dc.title Seeing is believing: metabolism provides insight into threat perception for a prey species of coral reef fish
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.03.008
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000375654900013


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Publication


Browse

My Account