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Fine-scale environmental specialization of reef-building corals might be limiting reef recovery in the Florida Keys

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Univ Texas Austin
dc.contributor University Of Texas Austin
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Dept Integrat Biol
dc.contributor University Of Texas System
dc.contributor.author MATZ, MIKHAIL V.
dc.contributor.author KENKEL, CARLY D.
dc.contributor.author ALMANZA, ALBERT T.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:06:22Z
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-05T04:46:52Z
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-05T04:46:52Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:19:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-05T04:46:52Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:06:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:06:22Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:19:01Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12-01
dc.identifier.citation Kenkel CD, Almanza AT, Matz MV (2015) Fine-scale environmental specialization of reef-building corals might be limiting reef recovery in the Florida Keys. Ecology 96(12): 3197-3212 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0012-9658
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/12806
dc.description.abstract Despite decades of monitoring global reef decline, we are still largely unable to explain patterns of reef deterioration at local scales, which precludes the development of effective management strategies. Offshore reefs of the Florida Keys, USA, experience milder temperatures and lower nutrient loads in comparison to inshore reefs yet remain considerably more degraded than nearshore patch reefs. A year-long reciprocal transplant experiment of the mustard hill coral (Porites astreoides) involving four source and eight transplant locations reveals that corals adapt and/or acclimatize to their local habitat on a <10-km scale. Surprisingly, transplantation to putatively similar environmental types (e.g., offshore corals moved to a novel offshore site, or along-shore transplantation) resulted in greater reductions in fitness proxies, such as coral growth, than cross-channel transplantation between inshore and offshore reefs. The only abiotic factor showing significantly greater differences between along-shore sites was daily temperature range extremes (rather than the absolute high or low temperatures reached), providing a possible explanation for this pattern. Offshore-origin corals exhibited significant growth reductions at sites with greater daily temperature ranges, which explained up to 39% of the variation in their mass gain. In contrast, daily temperature range explained at most 9% of growth variation in inshore-origin corals, suggesting that inshore corals are more tolerant of high-frequency temperature fluctuations. Finally, corals incur trade-offs when specializing to their native reef. Across reef locations the coefficient of selection against coral transplants was 0.07 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SE). This selection against immigrants could hinder the ability of corals to recolonize devastated reefs, whether through assisted migration efforts or natural recruitment events, providing a unifying explanation for observed patterns of coral decline in this reef system.
dc.description.sponsorship Funding for this study was provided by a P.E.O. Scholar Award, PADI Foundation Grant number 5244, and an EEB DDIG-like grant to C. D. Kenkel; and National Science Foundation grants DEB-1054766 and DEB-1311220 to M. V. Matz. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship The authors would like to thank the staff of Mote Tropical Research Laboratory and Keys Marine Laboratory for their assistance in the design, execution and maintenance of the transplant experiments. In particular, the efforts of E. Bartels, C. Walter, C. Lewis, T. Luna, and B. Ferrell were critical to the success of this experiment. K. Thompson and A. Ibanez helped with sample processing for phenotypic measures. We are grateful to M. Strader for creating the Florida Keys GIS map. Funding for this study was provided by a P.E.O. Scholar Award, PADI Foundation Grant number 5244, and an EEB DDIG-like grant to C. D. Kenkel; and National Science Foundation grants DEB-1054766 and DEB-1311220 to M. V. Matz.
dc.description.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1890/14-2297.1/full en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher ESA en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Larval Dispersal
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Porites-astreoides
dc.subject Acclimatization
dc.subject Local Adaptation
dc.subject Trade-offs
dc.subject Reef-building Corals
dc.subject Porites Astreoides
dc.subject Climate-change
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Inshore
dc.subject Populations
dc.subject Selection
dc.subject Thermal Tolerance
dc.subject Adaptation
dc.subject Fitness Trade-offs
dc.subject Decline
dc.subject Offshore
dc.subject Spawning Corals
dc.title Fine-scale environmental specialization of reef-building corals might be limiting reef recovery in the Florida Keys
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1890/14-2297.1
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000367287900008


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