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Responses of three tropical seagrass species to CO2 enrichment

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dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor Ctr Trop Water & Aquat Ecosyst Res Tropwater
dc.contributor Coll Marine & Environm Sci
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor.author UTHICKE, S.
dc.contributor.author OW, Y. X.
dc.contributor.author COLLIER, C. J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:04:29Z
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-06T03:43:46Z
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-06T03:43:46Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:10:15Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-06T03:43:46Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:04:29Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:04:29Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:10:15Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05-01
dc.identifier.citation Ow YX, Collier CJ, Uthicke S (2015) Responses of three tropical seagrass species to CO2 enrichment. Marine Biology 162(5): 1005-1017 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0025-3162
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/12947
dc.description.abstract Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide leads to ocean acidification and carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment of seawater. Given the important ecological functions of seagrass meadows, understanding their responses to CO2 will be critical for the management of coastal ecosystems. This study examined the physiological responses of three tropical seagrasses to a range of seawater pCO(2) levels in a laboratory. Cymodocea serrulata, Halodule uninervis and Thalassia hemprichii were exposed to four different pCO(2) treatments (442-1204 mu atm) for 2 weeks, approximating the range of end-of-century emission scenarios. Photosynthetic responses were quantified using optode-based oxygen flux measurements. Across all three species, net productivity and energetic surplus (P (G):R) significantly increased with a rise in pCO(2) (linear models, P < 0.05). Photosynthesis-irradiance curve-derived photosynthetic parameters-maximum photosynthetic rates (P (max)) and efficiency (alpha)-also increased as pCO(2) increased (linear models, P < 0.05). The response for productivity measures was similar across species, i.e. similar slopes in linear models. A decrease in compensation light requirement (E (c)) with increasing pCO(2) was evident in C. serrulata and H. uninervis, but not in T. hemprichii. Despite higher productivity with pCO(2) enrichment, leaf growth rates in C. serrulata did not increase, while those in H. uninervis and T. hemprichii significantly increased with increasing pCO(2) levels. While seagrasses can be carbon-limited and productivity can respond positively to CO2 enrichment, varying carbon allocation strategies amongst species suggest differential growth response between species. Thus, future increase in seawater CO2 concentration may lead to an overall increase in seagrass biomass and productivity, as well as community changes in seagrass meadows.
dc.description.sponsorship The work was supported by funding from the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation (Project title: Investigating the effects of seagrass productivity on pH at local scales) en_US
dc.description.sponsorship We thank Martina De Freitas Prazeres, Nikolas Vogel and Michelle Liddy for assistance with the set-up and running of the experiment. Miwa Takahashi and Lucas Langois provided assistance in the field. The work was supported by funding from the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation (Project title: Investigating the effects of seagrass productivity on pH at local scales).
dc.description.uri http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00227-015-2644-6 en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Springer en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Photosynthetic Utilization
dc.subject Climate-change
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Bicarbonate Use
dc.subject Elevated Carbon-dioxide
dc.subject Inorganic Carbon
dc.subject Coralline Algae
dc.subject Eelgrass Zostera-marina
dc.subject Ocean Acidification
dc.subject Thalassia-testudinum
dc.title Responses of three tropical seagrass species to CO2 enrichment
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s00227-015-2644-6
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000352798800009


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