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The effects of ocean acidification on zooplankton: Using natural CO2 seeps as windows into the future

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dc.contributor.author Fabricius, Katharina (KE)
dc.contributor.author Smith, Joy (JN)
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-20T23:58:00Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:07:35Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:15:55Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-20T23:58:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:07:35Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:15:55Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12
dc.identifier.citation Fabricius KE, Smith JN (2016) The effects of ocean acidification on zooplankton: Using natural CO2 seeps as windows into the future. Progress Report. Great Barrier Reef Foundation, Brisbane (10 pp) en_US
dc.identifier.other ELO TASK 2514
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/13001
dc.description.abstract Reef-associated zooplankton provide food for many fish and corals in the Great Barrier Reef, and yet we know very little about their future under ocean acidification conditions. Of the >7,000 known zooplankton species, less than 30 species have been studied for their responses to ocean acidification (OA), and all of these studies have been single-species laboratory experiments. Therefore, nearly nothing is known about how ocean acidification will affect entire zooplankton communities in the field. Two natural carbon dioxide seeps in Papua New Guinea create natural CO2 gradients in the seawater, simulating future high CO2 conditions under predicted OA. At these sites, we can compare healthy reefs (unaffected by OA) to reefs under CO2 levels expected for the end of the century. We used these seeps to look at the possible consequences of OA on entire zooplankton communities living residential to coral reefs. Our GBRF project focuses this year on the analysis of our past zooplankton field studies. Our data show that over the course of three expeditions and at two separate seep sites, zooplankton abundance was consistently reduced under OA. There was no drastic shift in the community, i.e. all groups were reduced under elevated CO2 and no taxon thrived under OA. A first manuscript is almost complete, in which we show that the important copepod family Pontellidae (which was previously considered pelagic) is living in coral rubble amongst the reef, and is reduced in numbers under ocean acidification. We have also almost completed a manuscript summarising our field and laboratory experiments that demonstrate that the stony coral, Galaxea fascicularis, ingests less zooplankton under OA, even when the same amount of zooplankton is given as food. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship GBRF en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher GBRF en_US
dc.title The effects of ocean acidification on zooplankton: Using natural CO2 seeps as windows into the future en_US
dc.type report en_US


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