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Using a thermistor flowmeter with attached video camera for monitoring sponge excurrent speed and oscular behaviour

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Western Australian Marine Sci Inst
dc.contributor Ctr Microscopy Characterisat & Anal
dc.contributor University Of Western Australia
dc.contributor Univ Western Australia
dc.contributor Sch Plant Biol
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Oceans Inst
dc.contributor.author DUCKWORTH, ALAN
dc.contributor.author STREHLOW, BRIAN W.
dc.contributor.author JORGENSEN, DAMIEN
dc.contributor.author WEBSTER, NICOLE S.
dc.contributor.author PINEDA, MARI-CARMEN
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:04:50Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-13T00:44:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-13T00:44:30Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:02:02Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-13T00:44:30Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:04:50Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:04:50Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:02:02Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-13
dc.identifier.citation Strehlow BW, Jorgensen D, Webster NS, Pineda MC, Duckworth A (2016) Using a thermistor flowmeter with attached video camera for monitoring sponge excurrent speed and oscular behaviour. PeerJ 4: e2761 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2167-8359
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/13155
dc.description.abstract A digital, four-channel thermistor flowmeter integrated with time-lapse cameras was developed as an experimental tool for measuring pumping rates in marine sponges, particularly those with small excurrent openings (oscula). Combining flowmeters with time-lapse imagery yielded valuable insights into the contractile behaviour of oscula in Cliona orientalis. Osculum cross-sectional area (OSA) was positively correlated to measured excurrent speeds (ES), indicating that sponge pumping and osculum contraction are coordinated behaviours. Both OSA and ES were positively correlated to pumping rate (Q). Diel trends in pumping activity and osculum contraction were also observed, with sponges increasing their pumping activity to peak at midday and decreasing pumping and contracting oscula at night. Short-term elevation of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) within the seawater initially decreased pumping rates by up to 90%, ultimately resulting in closure of the oscula and cessation of pumping.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by the Western Australian Marine Science Institution (WAMSI) as part of the WAMSI Dredging Science Node, and made possible through investment from Chevron Australia, Woodside Energy Limited, BHP Billiton as environmental offsets and by co-investment from the WAMSI Joint Venture partners. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of WAMSI. NSW was funded by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship FT120100480. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by the Western Australian Marine Science Institution (WAMSI) as part of the WAMSI Dredging Science Node, and made possible through investment from Chevron Australia, Woodside Energy Limited, BHP Billiton as environmental offsets and by co-investment from the WAMSI Joint Venture partners. NSW was funded by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship FT120100480 en_US
dc.description.uri https://peerj.com/articles/2761/ en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher PeerJ en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 Australia *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/ *
dc.subject Contractions
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject Sediment
dc.subject Coral-reefs
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Marine Sponges
dc.subject Pumping Rates
dc.subject Porifera
dc.subject Pumping
dc.subject Demospongiae
dc.subject Sponge
dc.subject Flowmeter
dc.subject Acidification
dc.subject Contraction
dc.subject Behaviour
dc.subject Thermistor
dc.subject Tethya-wilhelma
dc.subject Fresh-water Sponge
dc.title Using a thermistor flowmeter with attached video camera for monitoring sponge excurrent speed and oscular behaviour
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.7717/peerj.2761
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000390053500009


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