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Enhanced macroboring and depressed calcification drive net dissolution at high-CO2 coral reefs

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Aoml
dc.contributor National Oceanic Atmospheric Admin (noaa) - Usa
dc.contributor Univ Miami
dc.contributor Rosenstiel Sch Marine & Atmospher Sci
dc.contributor Noaa
dc.contributor Cooperat Inst Marine & Atmospher Studies
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor University Of Miami
dc.contributor.author FABRICIUS, KATHARINA E.
dc.contributor.author ENOCHS, IAN C.
dc.contributor.author MANZELLO, DEREK P.
dc.contributor.author KOLODZIEJ, GRAHAM
dc.contributor.author NOONAN, SAM H. C.
dc.contributor.author VALENTINO, LAUREN
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-13T00:46:28Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:05:02Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-13T00:46:28Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:18:54Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-13T00:46:28Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-13T00:46:28Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:05:02Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:18:54Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-16
dc.identifier.citation Enochs IC, Manzello DP, Kolodziej G, Noonan SHC, Valentino L, Fabricius KE (2016) Enhanced macroboring and depressed calcification drive net dissolution at high-CO2 coral reefs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences 283(1842): 20161742 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0962-8452
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/13169
dc.description.abstract Ocean acidification (OA) impacts the physiology of diverse marine taxa; among them corals that create complex reef framework structures. Biological processes operating on coral reef frameworks remain largely unknown from naturally high-carbon-dioxide (CO2) ecosystems. For the first time, we independently quantified the response of multiple functional groups instrumental in the construction and erosion of these frameworks (accretion, macroboring, microboring, and grazing) along natural OA gradients. We deployed blocks of dead coral skeleton for roughly 2 years at two reefs in Papua New Guinea, each experiencing volcanically enriched CO2, and employed high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to create three-dimensional models of changing skeletal structure. OA conditions were correlated with decreased calcification and increased macroboring, primarily by annelids, representing a group of bioeroders not previously known to respond to OA. Incubation of these blocks, using the alkalinity anomaly methodology, revealed a switch from net calcification to net dissolution at a pH of roughly 7.8, within Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) predictions for global ocean waters by the end of the century. Together these data represent the first comprehensive experimental study of bioerosion and calcification from a naturally high-CO2 reef ecosystem, where the processes of accelerated erosion and depressed calcification have combined to alter the permanence of this essential framework habitat.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation's 'Resilient Coral Reefs Successfully Adapting to Climate Change' research and development program in collaboration with the Australian Government, the Australian Institute of Marine Science. NOAA's Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) provided funding for the micro-CT and analysis software, respectively. en_US
dc.description.uri http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1842/20161742 en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher The Royal Society Publishing en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 Australia *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/ *
dc.subject Micro-ct
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Dissolution
dc.subject Strength
dc.subject Biology
dc.subject Bioerosion
dc.subject Coral Reef
dc.subject Calcification
dc.subject Evolutionary Biology
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Organisms
dc.subject Dead Corals
dc.subject Porites-lobata
dc.subject Communities
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
dc.subject Skeletons
dc.subject Damselfish Territoriality
dc.subject Ocean Acidification
dc.subject French-polynesia
dc.title Enhanced macroboring and depressed calcification drive net dissolution at high-CO2 coral reefs
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1098/rspb.2016.1742
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000388718700010


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