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Happy relationships between marine sponges and sediments - a review and some observations from Australia

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Western Australian Marine Sci Inst
dc.contributor Western Australian Museum
dc.contributor University Of Western Australia
dc.contributor Univ Western Australia
dc.contributor Aquat Zool
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Oceans Inst
dc.contributor.author SCHOENBERG, CHRISTINE HANNA LYDIA
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-13T00:48:55Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-13T00:48:55Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:05:15Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:08:31Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:05:15Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-13T00:48:55Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-13T00:48:55Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:08:31Z
dc.date.issued 2016-03-01
dc.identifier.citation Schönberg CHL (2016) Happy relationships between marine sponges and sediments - a review and some observations from Australia. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 96(2): 493-514 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0025-3154
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/13188
dc.description Proceedings of the 9th World Sponge Conference: New Frontiers in Sponge Science, Fremantle en_US
dc.description.abstract Being sessile filter feeders, sponges may be disadvantaged by sediments in many ways, e.g. through clogging and burial. However, in order to correctly recognize negative effects of sediments in the field, natural relationships of sponge taxa adapted to a life with sediments need to be understood. The present publication reviews available literature and provides observations on natural and beneficial interactions of sponges with sediments, distinguishing several strategies: (1) Saving energy through sediment incorporation, reducing or replacing spicule production commonly occurs in keratose, verongimorph, tethyid and poecilosclerid sponges, which often received scientific names referring to sediments. (2) Forming sediment crusts externally or embedded in surface tissues reinforces outer layers, provides shade, and for external crusts camouflage and shelter from spongivory and desiccation. External crusts often occur in the tethyids and axinellids, while surface armour is most common in keratose sponges. (3) Anchoring in soft sediments provides a selective advantage for space colonization. This is mainly achieved in the hexactinellid, polymastiid and spirophorine sponges by using spicules (predominantly in deeper water), commonly in endopsammic sponges by rootlets, basal agglutination and basal incorporation of particles, and in various groups by attachment to buried materials (shallow water). (4) Living at least partially embedded in sediments (psammobiosis) appears to be best developed in Oceanapia spp. and bioeroding sponges, generates shelter fromvarious external conditions and reduces the risk of spongivory. Typical morphological characters of sediment-adapted sponges are thus sediment skeletons and surface crusts (reinforcement), stalks and fistules (elevation above sediments), spicule tufts and root-systems (anchoring).
dc.description.sponsorship This publication is part of a literature review for project 6.1 on dredging effects on north-western Australian filter feeders administered through the Western Australian Marine Science Institution, led by R. Jones, R. Masini, C. Sim and K. Crane and is co-funded by The Australian Institute of Marine Science and Chevron Australia. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This publication is part of a literature review for project 6.1 on dredging effects on north-western Australian filter feeders administered through the Western Australian Marine Science Institution, led by R. Jones, R. Masini, C. Sim and K. Crane and is co-funded by The Australian Institute of Marine Science and Chevron Australia. This work would have been impossible without the assistance of library staff at the Australian Institute of Marine Science and the University of Western Australia. Various sponge colleagues provided even more literature that was not easily accessible, discussed some ideas with me from their angle of expertise or helped with some difficult taxonomic issues, which was very much appreciated: R. van Soest, N. Boury-Esnault, P. Cardenas, F. Hoffmann and A. Pisera. Photographs of hexactinellid sponges were taken at the Western Australian Museum, while H. Reiswig, D. Janussen and P. Cardenas sent me more photographs by email, and C. Goecke the Senckenberg collection details (I acknowledge the Senckenberg Museum Frankfurt for use of this material). Information on Western Australian sponges was derived from the following projects: Ningaloo data - Predicting biodiversity using biological and physical surrogates, The Marine Biodiversity Hub, Commonwealth Environment Research Facilities Program (CERF); Kimberley data Sponge trophodynamics in NW Australia, Patterns and processes in tropical marine biodiversity, Australian Institute of Marine Science; data from Onslow - Defining thresholds and indicators of filter feeder responses to dredging-related pressures, Project 6.3 of the Western Australian Marine Science Institute Dredging Node; all other data Monitoring and detecting changes in bioerosion, Sustainable use of NW marine ecosystems, Australian Institute of Marine Science. J. Fromont and O. Gomez identified species from Western Australia (as well as participants of the CERF workshop for specimens from Carnarvon Shelf, see Schonberg et al., 2012). The crew of RV Solander and staff at the research stations at Orpheus and One Tree Island, colleagues and field assistants are acknowledged for field support. Skeletal sections of sponges and respective images were made by S. Tecchiato at the Western Australian Museum and digitalized at the Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis (CMCA) at the University of Western Australia with the Scanscope digital slide scanner, assisted by P. Rigby. E. Buttner and F. Siebler tested the use of microcomputer tomography for various aspects of visualizing and quantifying sponge biology, also at the CMCA, assisted by T. Abel. E. Voultsiadou checked the translations of the Greek names making some helpful suggestions. A. Martins Sequeira, H. Reiswig and P. Cardenas read the manuscript before submission and helped in improving it.
dc.description.uri https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-the-marine-biological-association-of-the-united-kingdom/article/div-classtitlehappy-relationships-between-marine-sponges-and-sediments-a-review-and-some-observations-from-australiadiv/A8E927A56D5F7C0D16D6BF1B9DC4AE50/core-reader en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Cambridge en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.ispartof Proceedings of the 9th World Sponge Conference held in Fremantle Australia in 2013: New Frontiers in Sponge Science. en_US
dc.subject Antarctic Sponges
dc.subject Management
dc.subject Conservation
dc.subject Coral-reefs
dc.subject Particle-transport
dc.subject Psammobiosis
dc.subject Mud
dc.subject Benthic Invertebrates
dc.subject Adaptation
dc.subject Porifera
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Chondrosia-reniformis Porifera
dc.subject Demospongiae
dc.subject Sediment Incorporation
dc.subject Species Composition
dc.subject British-columbia
dc.subject Sand
dc.subject Shallow-water
dc.subject Anchoring
dc.subject Surface Crusts
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.title Happy relationships between marine sponges and sediments - a review and some observations from Australia
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/S0025315415001411
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000371163700025


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