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Predation scars may influence host susceptibility to pathogens: evaluating the role of corallivores as vectors of coral disease

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dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Aims Jcu
dc.contributor Arc Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor Coll Sci & Engn
dc.contributor.author HOOGENBOOM, M. O.
dc.contributor.author NICOLET, K. J.
dc.contributor.author CHONG-SENG, K. M.
dc.contributor.author WILLIS, B. L.
dc.contributor.author PRATCHETT, M. S.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-22T18:56:55Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-22T18:56:55Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-08T02:16:48Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-22T18:56:55Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-22T18:56:55Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-08T02:16:48Z
dc.date.issued 2018-03-27
dc.identifier.citation Nicolet KJ, Chong-Seng KM, Pratchett MS, Willis BL, Hoogenboom MO (2018) Predation scars may influence host susceptibility to pathogens: evaluating the role of corallivores as vectors of coral disease. Scientific Reports 8: 5258
dc.identifier.issn 2045-2322
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/14482
dc.description.abstract Infectious diseases not regulated by host density, such as vector-borne diseases, have the potential to drive population declines and extinctions. Here we test the vector potential of the snail Drupella sp. and butterflyfish Chaetodon plebeius for two coral diseases, black band (BBD) and brown band (BrB) disease. Drupella transmitted BrB to healthy corals in 40% of cases immediately following feeding on infected corals, and even in 12% of cases 12 and 24 hours following feeding. However, Drupella was unable to transmit BBD in either transmission treatment. In a field experiment testing the vector potential of naturally-occurring fish assemblages, equivalent numbers of caged and uncaged coral fragments became infected with either BrB, BBD or skeletal eroding band, indicating that corallivorous fish were unlikely to have caused transmission. In aquaria, C. plebeius did not transmit either BBD or BrB, even following extended feeding on both infected and healthy nubbins. A literature review confirmed only four known coral disease vectors, all invertebrates, corroborating our conclusion that polyp-feeding fishes are unlikely to be vectors of coral diseases. This potentially because polyp-feeding fishes produce shallow lesions, not allowing pathogens to invade coral tissues. In contrast, corallivorous invertebrates that create deeper feeding scars increase pathogens transmission.
dc.description.sponsorship We are grateful for field and logistic supports provided by Anne Hoggett and Lyle Vail and the rest of LIRS's Staff. This paper has benefited from discussion with Y. Sato and J. Pollock and field support from K. Quigley, A. Vail, T. Rueger and D. Coker. This work was supported by The Australian Natural History Museum (LIRS Internship), James Cook University and the ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies.
dc.language English
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Extinction Risk
dc.subject Building Corals
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject Brown-band Disease
dc.subject Transmission
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Scleractinian Corals
dc.subject White Syndrome
dc.subject Emerging Infectious-diseases
dc.subject Porites
dc.subject Bacterial Communities
dc.title Predation scars may influence host susceptibility to pathogens: evaluating the role of corallivores as vectors of coral disease
dc.type journal article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-018-23361-y
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000428367300013


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