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The importance of sample size in marine megafauna tagging studies

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dc.contributor King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol
dc.contributor Indian Ocean Marine Res Ctr M096
dc.contributor The Lab
dc.contributor Oceans Grad Sch
dc.contributor University of Western Australia
dc.contributor Natl Oceanog Ctr Southampton
dc.contributor University of South Alabama
dc.contributor University of California System
dc.contributor CSIC
dc.contributor Deakin University
dc.contributor Sch Biol Sci
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor University of California Santa Cruz
dc.contributor NERC National Oceanography Centre
dc.contributor CSIC-UIB - Instituto de Fisica Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (IFISC)
dc.contributor Marine Biological Association United Kingdom
dc.contributor Universitat de les Illes Balears
dc.contributor Univ S Alabama
dc.contributor Sydney Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Univ Tasmania
dc.contributor Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol
dc.contributor Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC)
dc.contributor Oceans Inst
dc.contributor Macquarie University
dc.contributor University of Tasmania
dc.contributor University of Southampton
dc.contributor Swansea Univ
dc.contributor Dauphin Isl Sea Lab
dc.contributor Swansea University
dc.contributor Smithsonian Conservat Biol Inst
dc.contributor Univ Western Australia
dc.contributor NERC Natural Environment Research Council
dc.contributor IFISC
dc.contributor Australian Institute of Marine Science
dc.contributor Deakin Univ
dc.contributor Macquarie Univ
dc.contributor Univ Calif Santa Cruz
dc.contributor Inst Marine & Antarctic Studies
dc.contributor Marine Biol Assoc UK
dc.contributor Ocean & Earth Sci
dc.contributor Smithsonian National Zoological Park & Conservation Biology Institute
dc.contributor UIB
dc.contributor Natl Zool Pk
dc.contributor Migratory Bird Ctr
dc.contributor Oceans Grad Sch Univ
dc.contributor King Abdullah University of Science & Technology
dc.contributor IOMRC
dc.contributor Smithsonian Institution
dc.contributor RSRC
dc.contributor Dept Biol Sci
dc.contributor Univ Southampton
dc.contributor Dept Biosci
dc.contributor.author Wilson, R. P.
dc.contributor.author Meekan, M. G.
dc.contributor.author Costa, D. P.
dc.contributor.author Thums, M.
dc.contributor.author Harcourt, R.
dc.contributor.author Harrison, A-L
dc.contributor.author Heupel, M. R.
dc.contributor.author McMahon, C. R.
dc.contributor.author Ferreira, L. C.
dc.contributor.author Carmichael, R. H.
dc.contributor.author Fernandez-Gracia, J.
dc.contributor.author Calich, H. J.
dc.contributor.author Sequeira, A. M. M.
dc.contributor.author Eguiluz, V. M.
dc.contributor.author Hays, G. C.
dc.contributor.author Jonsen, I
dc.contributor.author Sims, D. W.
dc.contributor.author Duarte, C. M.
dc.contributor.author Lea, M-A
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-04T18:59:32Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-05T22:54:43Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-04T18:59:32Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-05T22:54:43Z
dc.date.issued 2019-07-16
dc.identifier.citation Sequeira AMM, Heupel MR, Lea MA, Eguiluz VM, Duarte CM, Meekan MG, Thums M, Calich HJ, Carmichael RH, Costa DP, Ferreira LC, Fernandez-Gracia J, Harcourt R, Harrison AL, Jonsen I, McMahon CR, Sims DW, Wilson RP, Hays GC (2019) The importance of sample size in marine megafauna tagging studies. Ecological Applications 29(6): e01947
dc.identifier.issn 1051-0761
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/15118
dc.description.abstract Telemetry is a key, widely used tool to understand marine megafauna distribution, habitat use, behavior, and physiology; however, a critical question remains: "How many animals should be tracked to acquire meaningful data sets?" This question has wide-ranging implications including considerations of statistical power, animal ethics, logistics, and cost. While power analyses can inform sample sizes needed for statistical significance, they require some initial data inputs that are often unavailable. To inform the planning of telemetry and biologging studies of marine megafauna where few or no data are available or where resources are limited, we reviewed the types of information that have been obtained in previously published studies using different sample sizes. We considered sample sizes from one to >100 individuals and synthesized empirical findings, detailing the information that can be gathered with increasing sample sizes. We complement this review with simulations, using real data, to show the impact of sample size when trying to address various research questions in movement ecology of marine megafauna. We also highlight the value of collaborative, synthetic studies to enhance sample sizes and broaden the range, scale, and scope of questions that can be answered.
dc.description.sponsorship G. C. Hays conceived the study and a first draft was compiled by A. M. M. Sequeira, G. C. Hays, M. Heupel, M.-A. Lea, and V. M. Eguiluz at a workshop organized by M. Thums, A. M. M. Sequeira, C. M. Duarte, M. G. Meekan, and V. M. Eguiluz. A. M. M. Sequeira and G. C. Hays led the writing of the manuscript. A. M. M. Sequeira, G. C. Hays, A.-L. Harrison, and H. J. Calich prepared the figures. All authors contributed to the manuscript and commented on drafts. A. M. M. Sequeira was supported by an ARC Grant (DE170100841), and the Australian Institute of Marine Science, G.C. Hays by the Bertarelli Foundation as part of the Bertarelli Programme in Marine Science, and H. J. Calich by an Australian Government RTP scholarship at UWA. Workshop funding was granted to M. Thums, A. M. M. Sequeira, and C. M. Duarte by the UWA Oceans Institute, the Australian Institute of Marine Science, and the Office of Sponsored Research at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We thank F. Bailleul, S. Goldsworthy, M. Hindell, and all other workshop attendees for initial discussions.
dc.language English
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject DIEL VERTICAL MIGRATION
dc.subject 1ST RECORDS
dc.subject key questions
dc.subject BASKING SHARKS
dc.subject telemetry studies
dc.subject PATTERNS
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject movement behavior
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject tracking data
dc.subject number of tags
dc.subject SEA
dc.subject PREDATOR
dc.subject SATELLITE TRACKING
dc.subject animal welfare
dc.subject FORAGING BEHAVIOR
dc.subject SEASONAL MOVEMENTS
dc.subject STRATEGIES
dc.title The importance of sample size in marine megafauna tagging studies
dc.type journal article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/eap.1947
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000476090300001


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