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POSTLARVAL AND JUVENILE SCOMBRIDS CAPTURED IN LIGHT TRAPS - PRELIMINARY-RESULTS FROM THE CENTRAL GREAT-BARRIER-REEF LAGOON

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dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author THORROLD, SR
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:47:41Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:47:41Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:15:36Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-21T21:32:14Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:15:36Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:15:36Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:47:41Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-21T21:32:14Z
dc.date.issued 1993-03-01
dc.identifier 2475 en
dc.identifier.citation Thorrold SR (1993) Post-larval and juvenile scombrids captured in light traps: preliminary results from the central Great Barrier Reef lagoon. Bulletin of Marine Science. 52: 631-641. en
dc.identifier.issn 0007-4977
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/2475
dc.description.abstract Light traps were used to catch post-larval and juvenile scombrids from the coastal waters of the central Great Barrier Reef. A total of 200 scombrid larvae and juveniles, representing at least six taxa, were caught during sampling periods October to January, 1988-1990. The individuals captured in the light traps provided unique specimens of small Scomberomorus, Cybiosarda elegans, Euthynnus affinis and Thunnus species from this area. Comparison of size-frequencies showed that light traps collected larger individuals than did a standard trawl net. A multi-gear sampling strategy, utilizing both towed nets and light traps, would provide a more complete description of the distribution and abundance patterns of small scombrids than either technique in isolation. Scombrid abundances were highly variable, with a maximum catch of 13 fish in a single trap in an hour. A single station on a single night accounted for almost 50% of the scombrids captured in 1988. This patch, which consisted of Scomberomorus and Thunnus species, was coherent over at least 1 km. All scombrid species were relatively abundant at stations 16-24 km from the coast. This corresponded to the position of a coastal boundary layer in the area-the significance of this boundary layer to the distributions of small scombrids is not yet known. Light traps, which can simultaneously sample large volumes of water over a range of spatial scales, may prove a cost-effective and efficient way of sampling post-larval and juvenile scombrids.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Bulletin of Marine Science - pages: 52: 631-641 en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.isreferencedby Link to Metadata Record - http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/89de4294-3f5b-4846-ad7d-e9d955bac076 en
dc.relation.uri http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/89de4294-3f5b-4846-ad7d-e9d955bac076 en
dc.subject Age
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Identification
dc.subject Growth
dc.subject Scomberomorus-cavalla
dc.subject United-states
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Mexico
dc.subject Abundance
dc.subject Gulf
dc.subject Bluefin Tuna
dc.subject King Mackerel
dc.title POSTLARVAL AND JUVENILE SCOMBRIDS CAPTURED IN LIGHT TRAPS - PRELIMINARY-RESULTS FROM THE CENTRAL GREAT-BARRIER-REEF LAGOON
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:A1993LD10500001


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