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Growth and development in the subtropical copepod Acrocalanus gibber

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor.author MCKINNON, AD
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:52:09Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:52:09Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:25:24Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:20:54Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:25:24Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:52:09Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:52:09Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:20:54Z
dc.date.issued 1996-11-01
dc.identifier 2675 en
dc.identifier.citation McKinnon AD (1996) Growth and development in the subtropical copepod Acrocalanus gibber. Limnology and Oceanography. 41: 1438-1447. en
dc.identifier.issn 0024-3590
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/2675
dc.description.abstract Growth rates of the subtropical copepod Acrocalanus gibber were measured in field incubations. Prosome length of adult females was correlated with rearing temperature, but variation in condition of copepods masked any correlation of temperature with carbon and nitrogen content, The resulting N-specific growth rates (G(N)) were log-linear and ranged from 0.49 to 0.72 d(-1) at temperatures of 24.4-29.2 degrees C. Highest growth rates occurred in the middle of the temperature range, but no relationship between G(N) and temperature could be established, although molting rare and generation time were correlated with temperature. Growth rate was negatively related to chlorophyll a concentration and was independent of particulate C and N. Nitrogen-specific egg production, measured either from wild-caught females or from females produced in the incubations, never exceeded 0.28 d(-1) (representing only 46% of G(N)) and was frequently near zero. In this respect, juvenile growth was less food-limited than was adult growth (measured as egg production), The measured duration of A. gibber developmental stages, particularly copepodite stages 1 and 5, varied in laboratory experiments, apparently as a result of variation in food composition, Molting rate, copepod weight, and the resulting growth rates appear to be influenced by food quality.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Limnology and Oceanography - pages: 41: 1438-1447 en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Calanus-pacificus
dc.subject Secondary Production
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Southern-california
dc.subject Narragansett Bay
dc.subject Phytoplankton Concentration
dc.subject Egg-production
dc.subject Body Size
dc.subject Marine Copepod
dc.subject Acartia-tonsa
dc.subject Limnology
dc.title Growth and development in the subtropical copepod Acrocalanus gibber
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:A1996WU27300007


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