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Biomass and productivity of tropical macroalgae on three nearshore fringing reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor.author KLUMPP, DW
dc.contributor.author SCHAFFELKE, B
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:26:31Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:53:20Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:26:31Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-08T02:27:48Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:26:31Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:26:31Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:53:20Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-08T02:27:48Z
dc.date.issued 1997-09-01
dc.identifier 3181 en
dc.identifier.citation Schaffelke B and Klumpp DW (1997) Biomass and productivity of tropical macroalgae on three nearshore fringing reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Botanica Marina. 40: 373-383. en
dc.identifier.issn 0006-8055
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/3181
dc.description.abstract Recently, concerns about human disturbance on coral reef communities have focused attention on macroalgae of nearshore fringing coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia (GBR). However, the scarcity of baseline information makes it difficult to establish whether nearshore reef communities in the central GBR are perturbed or in a 'natural' state. This study provides data on biomass and productivity of nearshore reef macroalgae to serve as background information for the detection of future community changes. Over a period of 15 months, we estimated: i) biomass of conspicuous macroalgae in transects at three nearshore fringing reefs and ii) in situ net growth rates and net production of Sargassum baccularia. In summer, biomass was significantly dominated by large Fucales, especially S. baccularia (up to 200 g ash free dry weight m(-2)). Ephemeral algae (species of Padina, Hydroclathrus, Colpomenia, Chnoospora, Laurencia) were most abundant in austral spring (up to 40 g AFDW m(-2)). Maximum growth rates of S. baccularia of 3-4% day(-1) (entire thalli) occurred during the summer, preceding the reproductive period. Subsequent shedding of lateral branches resulted in negative growth rates during autumn/winter. In situ growth of excised shoots showed seasonal patterns comparable to entire thalli, except that growth rates were always positive. Biomass specific net production of excised shoots was significantly higher from spring to autumn than during winter. Areal productivity of S. baccularia had a significant maximum of 3g C m(-2) day(-1) in spring, a value comparable to the productivity of coral-reef epilithic algal communities or temperate kelp forests. The high standing biomass, high productivity and a presumably rapid turnover of biomass via detrital pathways suggest that fucoid macroalgae are important contributors to the stock of organic compounds on these nearshore reefs.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.ispartof Botanica Marina - pages: 40: 373-383 en
dc.relation.uri http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/b9f3c1e8-68fe-4749-b3b4-da18f5f9b38c en
dc.subject Phase-shifts
dc.subject Magnetic Island
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Algal Communities
dc.subject Community Structure
dc.subject Queensland
dc.subject Flat
dc.subject Townsville
dc.subject Eutrophication
dc.subject Coral-reef
dc.subject Sargassum
dc.subject Plant Sciences
dc.title Biomass and productivity of tropical macroalgae on three nearshore fringing reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:A1997XZ65400002


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