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Genetic Connectivity among and Self-Replenishment within Island Populations of a Restricted Range Subtropical Reef Fish

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Sch Marine & Trop Biol
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor Univ Western Australia
dc.contributor University Of Western Australia
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Mol Ecol & Evolut Lab
dc.contributor Sch Plant Biol
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Arc Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies
dc.contributor Oceans Inst
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor.author VAN HERWERDEN, LYNNE
dc.contributor.author VAN DER MEER, MARTIN H.
dc.contributor.author HOBBS, JEAN-PAUL A.
dc.contributor.author JONES, GEOFFREY P.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-04T01:41:56Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:07:57Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:07:57Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:01:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:07:57Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-04T01:41:56Z
dc.date.available 2013-09-04T01:41:56Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:01:05Z
dc.date.issued 2012-11-21
dc.identifier.citation van der Meer MH, Hobbs J-PA, Jones GP, van Herwerden L (2012) Genetic connectivity among and self-replenishment within island populations of a restricted range subtropical reef fish. PLOS ONE 7(11): e49660 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/5323
dc.description.abstract Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly being advocated and implemented to protect biodiversity on coral reefs. Networks of appropriately sized and spaced reserves can capture a high proportion of species diversity, with gene flow among reserves presumed to promote long term resilience of populations to spatially variable threats. However, numerically rare small range species distributed among isolated locations appear to be at particular risk of extinction and the likely benefits of MPA networks are uncertain. Here we use mitochondrial and microsatellite data to infer evolutionary and contemporary gene flow among isolated locations as well as levels of self-replenishment within locations of the endemic anemonefish Amphiprion mccullochi, restricted to three MPA offshore reefs in subtropical East Australia. We infer high levels of gene flow and genetic diversity among locations over evolutionary time, but limited contemporary gene flow amongst locations and high levels of self-replenishment (68 to 84%) within locations over contemporary time. While long distance dispersal explained the species' integrity in the past, high levels of self-replenishment suggest locations are predominantly maintained by local replenishment. Should local extinction occur, contemporary rescue effects through large scale connectivity are unlikely. For isolated islands with large numbers of endemic species, and high local replenishment, there is a high premium on local species-specific management actions.
dc.description.sponsorship We are grateful for the valuable support and assistance provided by Sallyann Gudge and Ian Kerr at Lord Howe Island. We thank the Lord Howe Island Board, Envirofund Australia (Natural Heritage Trust) and the Lord Howe Island Marine Park for financial and logistical support. We thank the Australian Department of the Environment and Water Resources for funding and the Capricorn Star for excellent logistical support.
dc.description.sponsorship The authors are grateful for the Lord Howe Island Board, Envirofund Australia (Natural Heritage Trust) and the Lord Howe Island Marine Park for financial and logistical support. The authors thank the Australian Department of the Environment and Water Resources for funding. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
dc.description.sponsorship The authors are grateful for the Lord Howe Island Board, Envirofund Australia (Natural Heritage Trust) and the Lord Howe Island Marine Park for financial and logistical support. The authors thank the Australian Department of the Environment and Water Resources for funding. en_US
dc.description.uri http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0049660 en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher PLoS en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 Australia *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/ *
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Migration Rates
dc.subject Management
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject Comparative Phylogeography
dc.subject Conservation
dc.subject Red Throat Emperor
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Microsatellite Markers
dc.subject Coral-reef
dc.subject Marine Protected Areas
dc.subject Larval Dispersal
dc.title Genetic Connectivity among and Self-Replenishment within Island Populations of a Restricted Range Subtropical Reef Fish
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0049660
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000311821000078


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