Publication Repository

Background mortality rates for recovering populations of Acropora cytherea in the Chagos Archipelago, central Indian Ocean

Show simple item record

dc.contributor University Of Warwick
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Arc Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Aims Jcu
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Univ Warwick
dc.contributor Sch Marine Biol
dc.contributor Dept Biol Sci
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor.author SHEPPARD, C. R. C.
dc.contributor.author PRATCHETT, M. S.
dc.contributor.author PISAPIA, C.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-22T07:28:47Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-22T07:28:47Z
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-02T03:41:40Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-22T07:28:47Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-22T07:28:47Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-02T03:41:40Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05-01
dc.identifier.citation Pratchett MS, Pisapia C, Sheppard CRC (2013) Background mortality rates for recovering populations of Acropora cytherea in the Chagos Archipelago, central Indian Ocean. Marine Environmental Research 86: 29-34
dc.identifier.issn 0141-1136
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/579
dc.description.abstract This study quantified background rates of mortality for Acropora cytherea in the Chagos Archipelago. Despite low levels of anthropogenic disturbance, 27.5% (149/541) of A. cytherea colonies exhibited some level of partial mortality, and 9.0% (49/541) of colonies had recent injuries. A total of 15.3% of the overall surface area of physically intact A. cytherea colonies was dead. Observed mortality was partly attributable to overtopping and/or self-shading among colonies. There were also low-densities of Acanthaster planci apparent at some study sites. However, most of the recent mortality recorded was associated with isolated infestations of the coral crab, Cymo melanodactylus. A. cytherea is a relatively fast growing coral and these levels of mortality may be biologically unimportant. However, few studies have measured background rates of coral mortality, especially in the absence of direct human disturbances. These data are important for assessing the impacts of increasing disturbances, especially in projecting likely recovery. (c) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
dc.description.sponsorship This research was conducted during the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) Research Expedition of 2010, funded in part by the OTEP fund, UK. Field assistance was provided by N Graham, A Sheppard, P Raines and S Williams, while substantial logistic support was provided by crew onboard the MV Pacific Marlin.
dc.language English
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Tissue Lesions
dc.subject Dynamics
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Mortality
dc.subject Coral Reefs
dc.subject Toxicology
dc.subject Recovery
dc.subject Population Dynamics
dc.subject Community
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Resilience
dc.subject Acanthaster-planci
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject Patterns
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Climate-change
dc.subject Disturbance
dc.subject Cymo Melanodactylus
dc.subject Future
dc.subject Coral-reefs
dc.subject Building Corals
dc.subject Consequences
dc.title Background mortality rates for recovering populations of Acropora cytherea in the Chagos Archipelago, central Indian Ocean
dc.type journal article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.marenvres.2013.02.007
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000318138500004


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search Publication


Browse

My Account