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Rapid changes in shelf waters and pelagic communities on the southern Northwest Shelf, Australia, following a tropical cyclone

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author SKIRVING, W
dc.contributor.author MCKINNON, AD
dc.contributor.author MEEKAN, MG
dc.contributor.author CARLETON, JH
dc.contributor.author FURNAS, MJ
dc.contributor.author DUGGAN, S
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:48:18Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:41:47Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:48:18Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:27:11Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:41:47Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:41:47Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:48:18Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:27:11Z
dc.date.issued 2003-01-01
dc.identifier 6002 en
dc.identifier.citation McKinnon AD, Meekan MG, Carleton JH, Furnas MJ, Talbot S and Skirving WJ (2003) Rapid changes in shelf waters and pelagic communities on the southern Northwest Shelf, Australia, following a tropical cyclone. Continental Shelf Research. 23: 93-111. en
dc.identifier.issn 0278-4343
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/6002
dc.description.abstract A pronounced shift in water column characteristics and in the composition of plankton communities was observed following the passage of Tropical Cyclone Tiffany along the margin of the southern Northwest Shelf, Australia in January 1998. Satellite-derived images of sea surface temperature, meteorological and hydrographic data indicate a southward movement of shelf waters into the study area near North West Cape (21degrees46'S). Changes in water mass temperature and salinity characteristics also occurred as a result of local heating and evaporation. Local in situ growth was likely to have caused increases in micro-phytoplankton abundance, biomass and primary production on the shelf. A diverse, copepod-dominated shelf mesozooplankton community changed to a less diverse assemblage dominated by copepods usually found in shallow nearshore habitats. Post-cyclone larval fish catches included families absent or rare in pre-cyclone samples. In the case of copepods and larval fish, southward transport of water masses along the shelf was most likely to have caused the observed changes. Long-shore water transport forced by cyclonic winds may be a recurrent, but episodic mechanism of planktonic dispersal on the North West Shelf. Crown Copyright (C) 2003 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.ispartof Continental Shelf Research - pages: 23: 93-111 en
dc.subject Great-barrier-reef
dc.subject Transport
dc.subject Coastal Waters
dc.subject Fish Larvae
dc.subject Onshore Transport
dc.subject Copepod Egg-production
dc.subject Coral-reef
dc.subject Abundance
dc.subject Zooplankton
dc.subject Waves
dc.subject Fish Assemblages
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Mesozooplankton
dc.subject French-polynesia
dc.subject Cyclone
dc.subject Phytoplankton
dc.title Rapid changes in shelf waters and pelagic communities on the southern Northwest Shelf, Australia, following a tropical cyclone
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000180499200006


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