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A 'fair go' for coral hybridization

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor James Cook Univ N Queensland
dc.contributor Comparat Genom Ctr
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author VAN OPPEN, MJH
dc.contributor.author MILLER, DJ
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:18:00Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:18:00Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:48:58Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:18:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:18:00Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:48:58Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:48:58Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:18:00Z
dc.date.issued 2003-04-01
dc.identifier 6452 en
dc.identifier.citation Miller DJ and van Oppen MJH (2003) A 'fair go' for coral hybridization. Molecular Ecology. 12: 805-807. en
dc.identifier.issn 0962-1083
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/6452
dc.description Link to abstract/full text - http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-294X.2003.01808.x en
dc.description.abstract Hybridisation between coral species clearly occurs in vitro , but the evolutionary significance of this cross-fertility is still the subject of much debate. Compelling genetic and reproductive evidence support introgressive hybridization amongst Indo-Pacific members of the scleractinian genus Acropora . Although population genetic analyses indicate that interspecific hybridization events are relatively rare, they are likely be important on evolutionary time scales, creating the capacity for adaptive evolution by increasing genomic diversity and heterozygosity. However, in a recent paper based exclusively on the three endemic Caribbean Acropora species, Vollmer and Palumbi (2002) dispute the occurrence of reticulation in corals. Here we use data from both the Vollmer and Palumbi study and our earlier paper on the same species (van Oppen et al ., 2000) to show that reticulation has occurred amongst the Caribbean Acropora species. Furthermore, conclusions based on the limited Caribbean Acropora fauna cannot simply be extrapolated to Indo-Pacific corals, and it is inappropriate to view some coral species as 'immortal mules'.
dc.description.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-294X.2003.01808.x en
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Molecular Ecology - pages: 12: 805-807 en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Species Concepts
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Evolutionary Biology
dc.subject Reticulate Evolution
dc.subject Cnidaria
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Cytherea
dc.subject Introgression
dc.subject Evolutionary History
dc.subject Species Boundaries
dc.subject Hybridization
dc.subject Scleractinia
dc.subject Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
dc.subject Acropora-hyacinthus
dc.title A 'fair go' for coral hybridization
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1046/j.1365-294X.2003.01808.x en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000181862100001


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