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Coral reef calcification and climate change: The effect of ocean warming

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Climate & Ecosyst Crc
dc.contributor University Of New South Wales Sydney
dc.contributor Univ New S Wales
dc.contributor Ctr Environm Modelling & Predict
dc.contributor Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (csiro)
dc.contributor Csiro Marine Res & Antarctic
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Sch Math
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author BARNES, DJ
dc.contributor.author MCNEIL, BI
dc.contributor.author MATEAR, RJ
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:48:56Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:48:56Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:42:05Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-08T02:30:19Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:48:56Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:42:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:48:56Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-08T02:30:19Z
dc.date.issued 2004-11-30
dc.identifier 6837 en
dc.identifier.citation McNeil BI, Matear RJ and Barnes DJ (2004) Coral reef calcification and climate change: the effect of ocean warming. Geophysical Research Letters. 31: L22309-12. en
dc.identifier.issn 0094-8276
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/6837
dc.description Link to abstract/full text - http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2004GL021541 en
dc.description.abstract [ 1] Coral reefs are constructed of calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)). Deposition of CaCO(3) (calcification) by corals and other reef organisms is controlled by the saturation state of CaCO(3) in seawater (Omega) and sea surface temperature (SST). Previous studies have neglected the effects of ocean warming in predicting future coral reef calcification rates. In this study we take into account both these effects by combining empirical relationships between coral calcification rate and W and SST with output from a climate model to predict changes in coral reef calcification rates. Our analysis suggests that annual average coral reef calcification rate will increase with future ocean warming and eventually exceed pre-industrial rates by about 35% by 2100. Our results suggest that present coral reef calcification rates are equivalent to levels in the late 19th century and does not support previous suggestions of large and potentially catastrophic decreases in the future.
dc.description.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2004GL021541 en
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Geophysical Research Letters - pages: 31: L22309-12 en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Sea-surface Temperature
dc.subject Growth
dc.subject Photosynthesis
dc.subject Future
dc.subject Carbonate-ion Concentration
dc.subject Porites
dc.subject Community
dc.subject Co2 Partial-pressure
dc.subject Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
dc.subject Respiration
dc.subject Scleractinian Corals
dc.subject Geology
dc.title Coral reef calcification and climate change: The effect of ocean warming
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1029/2004GL021541
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000225583000005


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