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Relative importance of bacteria, microalgae and yeast for growth of the sponge Halichondria melanadocia (De Laubenfels, 1936): A laboratory study

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Harbor Branch
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Inst Oceanog
dc.contributor Div Biomed Marine Res
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author POMPONI, SA
dc.contributor.author DUCKWORTH, AR
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:46:15Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:46:15Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:52:20Z
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-01T03:20:25Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:46:15Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:52:20Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:46:15Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-01T03:20:25Z
dc.date.issued 2005-10-12
dc.identifier 6926 en
dc.identifier.citation Duckworth AR and Pomponi SA (2005) Relative importance of bacteria, microalgae and yeast for growth of the sponge Halichondria melanadocia (de Laubenfels, 1936): a laboratory study. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology. 323: 151-159. en
dc.identifier.issn 0022-0981
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/6926
dc.description Link to abstract/full text - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2005.03.007 en
dc.description.abstract Bacteria, microalgae and yeast less than 10 mu m in size are the primary food source of sponges but their relative contribution to somatic growth is poorly understood. In a laboratory study, the sponge Halichondria melanadocia was fed for 6 weeks a diet consisting solely of four bacterial strains, or a mixed diet consisting of bacteria, microalgae and yeast. Both diets were fed at three concentrations, based on the natural concentration (NC) of particles available to sponges: 115, 1 and 5NC. Mean final size of H. melanadocia was 40% greater on a mixed diet than on the bacteria diet, probably because of the greater supply of carbon and other essential nutrients in microalgae and yeast. Cell concentration also significantly affected the growth of H. melanadocia, with greatest growth for sponges fed at the highest cell concentration. The estimated carbon requirement for H. melanadocia to meet metabolic costs was 0.356 mg C l(-1) or 103 mu g C h(-1) gDW(-1). Many H. melanadocia appeared to be optimizing their surface area for food uptake. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
dc.description.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jembe.2005.03.007 en
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology - pages: 323: 151-159 en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.subject Bacteria
dc.subject Indian-river Lagoon
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Isochrysis-galbana
dc.subject Marine Sponges
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Clearance Rates
dc.subject Porifera
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Food
dc.subject Florida-bay
dc.subject Demospongiae
dc.subject Sponge
dc.subject Filtration
dc.subject Carbon
dc.subject Usa
dc.subject Ultraplankton
dc.title Relative importance of bacteria, microalgae and yeast for growth of the sponge Halichondria melanadocia (De Laubenfels, 1936): A laboratory study
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.jembe.2005.03.007
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000232673100005


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