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Storm-driven erosion of fine sediment and its subsequent transport and trapping in fringing mangroves, Sawi Bay, Thailand

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Chulalongkorn Univ
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Chulalongkorn University
dc.contributor Fac Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author MARSHALL, K
dc.contributor.author BRINKMAN, R
dc.contributor.author WATTAYAKORN, G
dc.contributor.author WOLANSKI, E
dc.contributor.author SPAGNOL, S
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:15:08Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:15:08Z
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:47:26Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-09T01:15:45Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:15:08Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:47:26Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:47:26Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-09T01:15:45Z
dc.date.issued 2005-03-01
dc.identifier 7075 en
dc.identifier.citation Brinkman RM, Wattayakorn G, Wolanski EJ, Spagnol SB and Marshall K (2005) Storm-driven erosion of fine sediment and its subsequent transport and trapping in fringing mangroves, Sawi Bay, Thailand. Journal of Coastal Research. SI 42: 211-220. en
dc.identifier.issn 0749-0208
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/7075
dc.description.abstract A field and model study was undertaken in 1998/1999 of the dynamics of water, fine sediment and particulate carbon in the degraded mangrove environment of Sawi Bay, Thailand. The currents were weak (<= 0.3 m s(-1)), and principally diurnal tidal. The mean currents were primarily controlled by the prevailing circulation in the adjoining Gulf of Thailand and river runoff. There was very little biological detritus present to act as a coagulant for the fine cohesive sediment in suspension in the mangrove-fringed, muddy coastal waters. The sediment in suspension was mostly fine silt and clay aggregated into small floes and resuspended by wind waves. This sediment was winnowed from the coastal zone and was advected back in this area by wind waves. The mangroves trap fine sediment and particulate carbon during such events. Riverine inflow of fine sediment in the mangroves was much smaller than the inflow of fine sediment from the sea. The mangroves at Sawi Bay grew on relatively shallow mud overlying a sandy substrate. They infilled with sediment and particulate carbon at a rate equal to, respectively, only 10% and 1% of that for the pristine mangrove environment of Hinchinbrook Channel, Australia. Further, mangroves were inundated only 10% as often at Sawi Bay than at Hinchinbrook, hence the export of nutrients from vegetation detritus was also smaller at Sawi Bay than at Hinchinbrook. Nutrient retention and recycling in mangroves were presumably higher at Sawi Bay than in Hinchinbrook Channel.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Journal of Coastal Research - pages: SI 42: 211-220 en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.uri https://apps.aims.gov.au/metadata/view/76a11b11-61f3-4211-9975-64abdf1d2f60
dc.subject Turbidity
dc.subject Dynamics
dc.subject Fly River Estuary
dc.subject Swamps
dc.subject Sediment
dc.subject Physical Geography
dc.subject Papua-new-guinea
dc.subject Carbon Flux
dc.subject Flocs
dc.subject Thailand
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Mangroves
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject Settling
dc.subject Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
dc.subject Sawi Bay
dc.subject Geography, Physical
dc.subject Geology
dc.title Storm-driven erosion of fine sediment and its subsequent transport and trapping in fringing mangroves, Sawi Bay, Thailand
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000230629600024


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