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GEOGRAPHICALLY SPECIFIC RECRUITMENT AND POSTSETTLEMENT MORTALITY AS INFLUENCES ON CORAL COMMUNITIES - THE CROSS-CONTINENTAL SHELF TRANSPLANT EXPERIMENT

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor.author SAMMARCO, PW
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:42:25Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:57:35Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T00:57:35Z
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-08T02:21:06Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:42:25Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:57:35Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T00:57:35Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-08T02:21:06Z
dc.date.issued 1991-05-01
dc.identifier 8275 en
dc.identifier.citation Sammarco PW (1991) Geographically specific recruitment and postsettlement mortality as influences on coral communities: The cross-continental shelf transplant experiment. Limnology and Oceanography. 36: 496-514. en
dc.identifier.issn 0024-3590
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/8275
dc.description.abstract The importance of geographic isolation in larval availability vs. postsettlement mortality as factors influencing coral community structure was examined. Coral recruitment and mortality patterns were assessed on the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) via settling plates implanted on three reefs located 16, 58, and 117 km from shore (across the continental shelf) at depths of 3 and 15 m. In a controlled experiment, plates were transplanted after 6 months of exposure to other reefs, covering all possible between-reef combinations. Recruitment was higher on the outer half of the shelf and in deeper water. Acropora and Seriatopora were the major recruits on the mid- and outer-shelf reefs, where adult Acropora dominates. Porites and Alveopora dominated the inner-shelf reef, where Porites is a dominant adult. Mortality was lowest on the midshelf reef. Inshore recruits suffered greater losses in competition for space. Coral larvae settled cryptically, except in deeper inshore waters (low light). Taxonomic gradients occurred across the shelf, suggesting some geographic isolation, and implying that local larval pools differ. Spat transplanted from the midshelf reef to inshore or offshore reefs suffered higher mortality rates. Transplants from offshore survived better on the midshelf reef. Transplants from inshore to mid- or offshore reefs appeared to survive well. Larval availability, regional seeding of reefs, and postsettlement mortality may together play important roles in influencing coral community structure.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.ispartof Limnology and Oceanography - pages: 36: 496-514 en
dc.relation.isreferencedby Link to Metadata Record - http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/9aea83a2-cbb3-4b7b-94fb-b7f90359b87d en
dc.relation.uri http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/9aea83a2-cbb3-4b7b-94fb-b7f90359b87d en
dc.subject Helix Experiment
dc.subject Dynamics
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Settlement
dc.subject Localized Dispersal
dc.subject Planktonic Larvae
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Competition
dc.subject Water
dc.subject Populations
dc.subject Patterns
dc.subject Great Barrier-reef
dc.subject Limnology
dc.title GEOGRAPHICALLY SPECIFIC RECRUITMENT AND POSTSETTLEMENT MORTALITY AS INFLUENCES ON CORAL COMMUNITIES - THE CROSS-CONTINENTAL SHELF TRANSPLANT EXPERIMENT
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:A1991GB76400008


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