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Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer)

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dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Aims Jcu Collaborat Res Program
dc.contributor Sch Marine & Trop Biol
dc.contributor James Cook Univ
dc.contributor James Cook University
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Arc Ctr Excellence Coral Reef Studies
dc.contributor Ctr Sustainable Trop Fisheries & Aquaculture
dc.contributor.author CARTON, ALEXANDER G.
dc.contributor.author COLLINS, GEOFFREY M.
dc.contributor.author CLARK, TIMOTHY D.
dc.contributor.author RUMMER, JODIE L.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:00:52Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:00:52Z
dc.date.accessioned 2014-01-23T00:55:42Z
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-02T04:13:51Z
dc.date.available 2014-01-23T00:55:42Z
dc.date.available 2014-01-23T00:55:42Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:00:52Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-02T04:13:51Z
dc.date.issued 2013-01-01
dc.identifier.citation Collins GM, Clark TD, Rummer JL, Carton AG (2013) Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer). Conservation Physiology 1(1): 10.1093/consphys/cot029 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2051-1434
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/9900
dc.description.abstract Tropical coastal systems are particularly prone to periods of environmental hypoxia, which can result from organismal respiration as well as thermal stratification, and may be further exacerbated by anthropogenic disturbances. In this study, we used five genetically distinct sub-populations of Australian barramundi (Lates calcarifer) to examine the extent of intraspecific variability in hypoxia tolerance. Fish were maintained at two temperatures (26 or 36 degrees C), representing the seasonal thermal range for this species across its tropical distribution in Australia. All fish maintained a constant oxygen consumption rate (M-O2) as air saturation of the water decreased from 100% down to a critical oxygen saturation ([O-2](crit)) of 15.44 +/- 3.20 and 21.07 +/- 3.92% (means +/- SD) at 26 and 36 degrees C, respectively. Mean [O-2](crit), used as a performance measure of hypoxia tolerance, did not differ between sub-populations. No differences were found for resting M-O2 between sub-populations at 26 degrees C, but modest differences were detected between two sub-populations at 36 degrees C (3.36 +/- 0.62 and 2.83 +/- 0.27 mg O-2 kg(-1) min(-1) for Gladstone and Broome sub-populations, respectively). Resting M-O2 was lower for sub-populations at 26 degrees C (1.46 +/- 0.26 mg O-2 kg(-1) min(-1)) than at 36 degrees C (3.10 +/- 0.43 mg O-2 kg(-1) min(-1)), with a temperature coefficient (Q(10)) of 2.12 +/- 0.30. We conclude that both hypoxia tolerance and resting M-O2 are conserved across the distribution of barramundi in Australia, which reflects the capacity of this species to cope in environments with large fluctuations in both temperature and dissolved oxygen.
dc.description.sponsorship This project was supported by funding from the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF). G.M.C. was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award and funding from the AIMS@JCU Collaborative Research Program. The Australian Institute of Marine Science supported T.D.C. and much of the experimental equipment used in this study. The authors wish to thank Professor Dean Jerry for his contribution to this project. All procedures used in this research were approved by the Animal Ethics Committee of James Cook University, Approval A1652.
dc.description.sponsorship This project was supported by funding from the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF). G.M.C. was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award and funding from the AIMS@JCU Collaborative Research Program. The Australian Institute of Marine Science supported T.D.C. and much of the experimental equipment used in this study. en_US
dc.description.uri http://conphys.oxfordjournals.org/content/1/1/cot029.full?sid=59946b2d-c587-4b95-9afc-f82a9291b033 en_US
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Oxford Journals (online only, fully open access journal) en_US
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 Australia *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/ *
dc.subject Critical Oxygen Saturation Hypoxia
dc.subject Lates Calcarifer
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Biodiversity Conservation
dc.subject Physiology
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject Barramundi
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject Tropical
dc.subject Climate Change
dc.subject Biodiversity & Conservation
dc.title Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer)
dc.type journal article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/conphys/cot029
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000209703700006


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