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SPATIAL PATTERNS IN SHALLOW-WATER CRINOID COMMUNITIES ON THE CENTRAL GREAT-BARRIER-REEF

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dc.contributor University Of Munich
dc.contributor Australian Inst Marine Sci
dc.contributor Univ Munich
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science
dc.contributor Australian Institute Of Marine Science (aims) en
dc.contributor.author FABRICIUS, KE
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T06:52:06Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:25:16Z
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-21T01:25:16Z
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-02T04:12:17Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T06:52:06Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:25:16Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-21T01:25:16Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-02T04:12:17Z
dc.date.issued 1994-01-01
dc.identifier 2682 en
dc.identifier.citation Fabricius KE (1994) Spatial patterns in shallow-water crinoid communities on the central Great Barrier Reef. Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research. 45: 1225-1236. en
dc.identifier.issn 0067-1940
dc.identifier.uri http://epubs.aims.gov.au/11068/2682
dc.description.abstract The crinoid communities of shallow-water areas (<12 m depth) of the central Great Barrier Reef were investigated on reefs at different locations on the continental shelf and in greater detail within one mid-shelf reef (Davies Reef). Overall, 43 comatulid crinoid species were identified, among which the family Comasteridae contributed 90% of the total number of collected specimens. High substratum complexity, in combination with high average water flows, characterized the most suitable environmental conditions for most of the crinoid species, whereas abundance and species richness were low in regions with high sedimentation rates and low current velocities. This set of environmental factors was correlated with crinoid community structures both on a local within-reef level and across the continental shelf. A few 'generalist' species (mostly comasterids) showed distribution ranges extending across the whole shelf, whereas many other species were found predominantly at the mid-shelf sites and only in low numbers, if at all, at both the inner and the outer shelf edges. Crinoid populations on reefs previously infested by Acanthaster planci were depleted in comparison with unaffected reefs. Observations suggest that the spangled emperor fish (Lethrinus nebulosus) is a major crinoid predator and that fatal predation occurs commonly among crinoids.
dc.language English
dc.language en en
dc.relation.ispartof Null
dc.relation.ispartof Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research - pages: 45: 1225-1236 en
dc.relation.uri http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/7eef0c40-85e6-11dc-8e98-00008a07204e en
dc.relation.uri http://data.aims.gov.au/metadataviewer/uuid/6453bd60-39c0-45f8-baa2-dda4358f16f2 en
dc.subject Fish
dc.subject Sedimentation
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Fisheries
dc.subject Comatulid Crinoids
dc.subject Oceanography
dc.subject Predation
dc.subject Lizard Island
dc.subject Australia
dc.subject Echinodermata
dc.subject Limnology
dc.title SPATIAL PATTERNS IN SHALLOW-WATER CRINOID COMMUNITIES ON THE CENTRAL GREAT-BARRIER-REEF
dc.type journal article en
dc.identifier.wos WOS:A1994QL12500010


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